Amy Lane

Amy Lane

Hi--

I'm Amy Lane, and I'm a writer.  There is no recovery.  I've written since I was very small, and even when I was getting my teaching credential at state college, I always knew that my passion was sharing stories with other people.  I've always written my own, but I didn't start sharing until I went to get my MA degree in 2000.  I didn't actually get the degree--but I did take a short story and turn it into a novel, and self-publish it in 2005.  I didn't expect so many people to enjoy the story (which was completely unedited, btw) and when they did… well, I never went back.  I couldn't stop writing now just like I couldn't stop breathing.  

I have four children-- two in college and two in grade school--and I've been married to the same man for 26 years.  I really can't believe it's been that long.  Much of what I know about love--and use in my stories--has been learned in those 26 years.  One of the most important things is that if you can't laugh through the bad times, you're doomed, and that if you can't forgive, it's not really love.  I try to incorporate this idea in my stories--they're my heartblood, the things I believe. 

I taught public high school for eighteen years, fifteen of them in an extremely diverse socio-economic setting.  When I write about a diverse population, it's because the people in my neighborhood--and in my imagination--are diverse and different, much like the population of any public school in California.  I love those differences.  They make my world a lot more wonderful.  

I've also always had animals--from the time I was a little girl, and the cat slept on my neck and my stepmom freaked out because she thought I'd smother in the night.  My characters have cats and dogs and goldfish and turtles and hamsters and rats for the same reason we all do-- a pet denotes a need for companionship and the willingness to take on that responsibility to make the relationship thrive.  

And I'm an avid knitter and crocheter-- I find a whole lot of the world makes sense when it's woven together with sticks and string.